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care reform, one of the authors of this bill, mr. waxman, the ranking member of energy and commerce, from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. the truth of the matter is no matter how many votes the republicans cast to repeal the affordable care act, and no matter how many distortions they spread about the law, there are some facts they cannot change. they cannot change the fact that because the affordable care act nobody in america can ever again be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. they cannot change the fact that a woman can never be charged more than a man for the same coverage. they cannot change the fact that a family will never again be left without coverage just because their child's hospital bills got too high. these facts are stubborn. they are inconvenient for my republican colleagues, so they ignore them and they deny them. republicans have voted or will today 50 times to try to take away the basic security and freedom guaranteed by the aff
in the ukraine. deteriorating. the country's energy situation is crucial. after the break, we'll find out who is waiting in -- who is weighing in on the ukraine's power struggles. ♪ >> welcome back. we're taking a closer look at europe's energy situation. affected by the conflict in the ukraine. what happens next is completely up in the air. joining us now is the executive chair of the global energy symposium. let's talk about europe's exposure to russian gas and the ukrainian throughput. to what extent should we be worried by the escalating situation? >> the longer this crisis remains, the greater the impact is going to be on energy expectations in europe. we are already seeing that this morning. of any has happened great significance in the ukraine other than some russian troops showing up in the crimea. it has been enough to start spiking prices and spiking future levels. that is going to be more pronounced as we move forward. the interesting thing is what is already doing in new york, which i think is an overreaction at -- moment, given what is at what is actually occurring. i keep tell
energy costs down whether it be in refining where he has the best chemicals to be able to get the most gasoline out of dirty oil, for instance, in the turbo which is what you need to be able to low your -- get more mileage out of each gallon. that's a very important thing. and, of course, he does the cockpits for pretty much everybody. he's done a remarkable job in honeywell, my charitable trust owns it. it's just been a gigantic winner. at one point they asked him about activism and he had a great answer when your stock goes up all the time the activists don't call. good man. >> is it your favorite industrial name? >> definitely. >> really? >> yeah dave cody is a remarkable guy, and yes, i'll admit we are next-door neighbors and he's also a terrific guy in person. >> you can't argue with what he brings to the interview and certainly with the stock as you said. we'll watch that closely along with exxon also having a -- >> yes, down. >>> in the meantime, former microsoft ceo steve ballmer giving a talk to graduate students at the university of oxford's school o
stock for 10-plus years, other than the energy sector, and that is where we thought the lifting of all of that public policy and certainty related to all of the government issues we have had the last two years, that would be the main driver and that durable a much more placed to pick consumer oriented companies. indexdid see the pricing today -- it went up a point more than people thought, giving some hope it would rebound a little bit. but guess what? the r&d taxon of credits last year. congress did not renew those. we are seeing bid increases -- big increases in november and december. we have seen nothing in february so far. what we do not know is whether we will see that building and, whether there was a temporal, prime shift with black -- prime shift -- >> you think that is inevitable? >> the good part of the durable goods report last month, or last week showed a big pickup in january. we had in industrials conference. we got a lot of positive .necdotes from these companies they are much more interested in capital spending or even nurtures and acquisitions than vying back stocks. i
of the leverage that president putin does have. partly, he has the energy, which flows underneath ukraine and supplies so much of europe. and more than that, he has now threatened, we are told, to no longer use the united states dollar as a currency on the world market. what if he did that? maria bartiromo from the fox business network will join us next to talk about the ramifications of such a thing. whether he could do it and what it would mean to our economy. would it, as the russians say, cripple our economy? that's next. t! [bell rings] this...is jane. her long day on set starts with shoulder pain... ...and a choice take 6 tylenol in a day which is 2 aleve for... ...all day relief. hmm. [bell ring] "roll sound!" "action!" [ chainsaw whirring ] humans -- sometimes liferips us up. sometimes we trip ourselveup. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... [ thump ] to speak with an insurance
an interesting note this morning, there's energy in the ukraine that could supplant the russians as far as being a supplier to western europe. there's a lot of things going on here. we'll hear more about it. this isn't going to go away. >> david molnar, you point out we're hovering around the fifth anniversary of the beginning of this bull market from the lows of march of '09. it's getting long in the tooth. is this market just running out of steam. is this a good excuse to sell today? >> yeah, bill, i think that's exactly what we're seeing here is that the market is a little bit extended, a little bit tired after a big run here off the january lows. we needed to see something come along that would create an impetus for consolidation, even a short-term correction, and this happens to be it right now. i agree with the prior two guests that this is probably going to be a short-term correction. it's not necessarily, you know, a change in trend here, but i would point out we do have friday's employment report coming out that's going to dictate a lot about, you know, the future direction of fed polic
in the implementation of innovative energy efficient environmentally friendly technologies as boston scientific research. for example in the lascivious institute of physics named after the scoop in line saying whoa said the scientific expertise in this year with domestic experts. mumbai. research work will be carried out on the bases of the region national university names of the old glove. we also plan implementation of pickle houses which will be realized for the development of a dual system of education. all decisions in the framework of the memorandum will be implemented. all projects will be certified for the compliance with international environmental standards. according to watson a famous pianist and music teacher valerie gets its key came to us tonight and i'm an artist of russia will hold master classes for young cousin musicians during five days. the young piano players are playing for a major event the international competition for young pianist which will be held in austin i made this year. last year the competition was held for the first time in more than one hundred thirty talents from tw
construction the parties intend to cooperate in the implementation of innovative energy efficient environmentally friendly technologies as boston scientific research. for example in the lascivious institute of the physics named after the scoop in line saying whoa said the scientific expertise in this year with domestic experts. mumbai. research work will be carried out on the basis of the region national university names of the old glove. we also plan implementation of pickle houses which will be realized for the development of a dual system of education. all decisions in the framework of the number of them will be implemented. all projects will be certified for the compliance with international environmental standards. according to watson a famous pianist and music teacher valerie gets its key came to us tonight and honored artist of russia will hold master classes for young cousin musicians during five days. the young piano players are playing for a major event the international competition for young pianist which will be held in austin i made this year. last year the competitio
are under way. they can develop alternative energy supplies, including fracking. including as the united states becomes an energy exporter, there are alternative sources there in the future and sources -- the inauguration of of the new pipeline project from the caspian sea which will be a new route for gas supplies into europe, not passing through russia, not from russia. this infrastructure will take time to develop but it is important to do so. the world is becoming increasingly unstable. this latest example to world peace is the classic case in my view. will the foreign secretary array with me -- agree with me that our country must rethink the funding of our armed forces to make sure we have the ships, the navy, the air force to me potential threats in the future. i am not hinting we should go to war on this case but it is a reminder we need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defen
in europe and it has really shrunk. potentially, they have big energy plans for europe. >> it is not proven yet. >> if it turns out that american companies are there -- >> let me ask about the united states. >> yeah. crimea, the have gas and -- but let me ask you about the united states role. you had friendly relations with george bush and you had good relations with the obama administration. i expect that you feel that the administration was not as helpful to georgia as they could have been and will not be as helpful in the ukraine because the united states has bigger fish to fry with russia. i do not think anybody can afford to neglect this. if they do, it is a major disaster. this guy is dangerous. this is going to continue. it is not limited to crimea. it allows us to have another crisis moving somewhere and everybody forgets what happened in georgia apostates. it is getting shorter and -- ter and >> to be fair, he said that he did not feel any need to escalate. >> they are using the word of escalation stop there with the occupation and europeans might escalating.is he is escalating. le
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
issues. this is the energy department's largest clean up anywhere in the united states. trying to take those 56 million-gallons of radioactive sludge that were in underground tanks. they are trying to turn that into solid glass. it is a massive project. how does this work? >> well the 17 self-tanks are distributed over quite a few square miles with an intricate net of pumps and pipes. when it is pumped to facility that i was previously supporting, we would then treat that waste chemically to get some of the more dangerous constituents out of it and then after we had treated it chemically we would put it into a melter with glass heat it up to high temperatures. >> the tanks that were underground were beginning to leak. they were old and the danger was some of them were fairly close to the colombia river and there is fear that somehow some of that radioactive material could get into the river. >> it is a fear based on reality. the single shell tanks which were actually decommissioned in the 40s and 50s, those tanks are known to have been leaking into the environment for years. we have co
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
whether to the level to buy yandex, concerned about the energy situation in germany, yeah, i mean maybe not time to pick things up. i agree with warren buffett. not hard to do, obviously, given his long-term track record. this is where you pick. you're getting a chance. he had a big sell-off friday afternoon and he kind of rallied in the last half hour. if we get those prices again at 330, count me in. count me in. >> fixing my collar here. always important that you look well in the morning when delivering and trying to opine and provide insight. >> the clothes make the man. >> of course on that note, studying up on ukraine and crimea and russia's history with it, and what khrushchev did in '54, whether he gave to them, whether thhe didn't want to dea with it. this forces money manages are to hit the history books. >> my producer, ukraine is -- actually i read the stories, warren's say, remember, 50% of the whole country is russian and the crimea is russian. so, this is kind of a -- apparently there's questions about resources and they use a lot of water in crimea. >> ukraine. >> a lot
the effects of reduced energy subsidies from russia. that's why ukrainians have been getting oil and gas and been able to do it cheaply. now that they want to rebuild the economy, they need to work with the imf on this. one of the things the imf is looking for them to do is raise energy prices. a lot is geared toward the energy factor. u.s. is sending technical advisors to work with the government on energy reforms and other types of financial reforms that they need to do to rebuild the economy. they also want to help the ukrainian businesses. they're talking about further assistance. they'll be sending advisors to work on anticorruption and recovering. is it enough? don't know. the ukrainians said they need $30 billion to rebuild the economy. this is a drop in the bucket. >> obviously the administration has been trying to motivate and rally members of the european union to join them in threatening at the at least sanctions and of punishments against the russian government and individuals in the russian government perhaps. i'm wondering what you've heard about the difficulties the u.s. h
,hose particularly energy. this has been about for the russian economy. the currency has fallen. the stock market is down. there was a reaction to this that may affect putin's economy. but i mention one other thing? is this beautiful and large country called ukraine. suppose ukraine finally after failing in 2004 get it right -- democracy, gets rid of corruption, the economy is improving, and it is there of the border for russia. i think it makes him nervous if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia. if the sanctions fail? what do you do it the pressure with his he continues own ambitious ideas of expanding within his own borders and spears of influence? >> go back to georgia in nato. if you tried something like that ay with one area that has significant russian popularity -- population, he would be attacking nato. that would be an entirely different set of circumstances. i have no illusions that in the short term, we will be able to ambitions.tin's in the long term, we can curb those ambitions in many ways, b
and offered general goals on taxes, trade, energy, and regulatory curves. pointing outl keep the upbeat economic outlook. >> let me jump in. we know congressional hearings on the budget again next week, including one wednesday with the finance committee chairman wyden. >> talking about breathing room for more -- he is new to the tax-writing panel. he has his own ideas about tax policy. again, it is a forum for airing ideas about the broader economy. you want be seeing the summit -- their democrats be doing own budget plan. the field the december agreement .ut the spending caps in place the republicans will do their own plan, which will contrast with the administration's blueprint. house republicans met and talked about alternatives to the health care law. next week, there is a bill scheduled. what about the bill and what is the current republican strategy? >> they obviously still object to obamacare. i think they have moved away from trying to repeal it. now they are going after individual pieces. the measure coming up next week has the same effect the bill the house passed has. it draw
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
it is a brokerage business. >> what happened once we did energy and we broker oil and we hang up the phone. we went into the shipping brokerage business. what is the difference? service and brokerage. you are not taking the risk, you're helping clients achieve their goals. you hire smart oh. we do huge amounts of analytics on real estate. nobody else does. mostly people say the real estate lead 45. instead of saying find to this kind of space at $31.90. bgc/cantorlass at and you jam and every piece of real estate. how do you decide which wants to buy? the same way you should be analyzing what real estate to invest in. what should you rent? that is why we are doing spectacularly well. big bcg is.ow it is a public company. about 450 billion dollars. how is cantor these days? >> we only had a billion 500 million in capital. morganlook at what stanley has, it keeps us nice and safe on the sidelines. we are owing to do things that ouran outperform with brains. take the managers and let them use in the platform they want. is getting in that business. how are you going to get in there? >> we are smart and
is leading the charge in developing alternative energy bio fuel from one of the world's most abundant life points to algae fossil fuels like oil rapidly disappearing. finding the new energy sources is critical. that's right touch of meats more authentic eco energy is finding ways to help local and international energy suppliers and infrastructure companies go green the algae is extracted because not only reduces climbed outside and smoke stacks. it also doesn't compete with cops for farmland. algae as a biofuel could produce thirty times more oil per acre than other crops such as corn and sugarcane. it will also be non toxic juice milk salt provide context and that i don't agree quickly the dpp group and the ppt fee of up to the twentieth anniversary of the eu single market we're also looking at the future of the single market and how it can cause acute europe's economic revival by creating more jobs and strong regret. perhaps the most promising prospects is the digital single block in the sector. abbas potential to win hearts our lives and our prosperity early this year the european commi
the energy situation. thank god, the weather is going to get warmer soon. he has those levers. he has an overwhelming military capability. there are many, many things, but particularly energy. but, you know, this has been bad for the russian economy. the value of their currency has fallen, the stock market is down. there is a negative reaction to this, too, that may effect putin's economy. and could i mention one other aspect of this is putin also sees -- here's this beautiful and large and magnificent country called ukraine. suppose ukraine, finally, after failing in 2004, gets it right, democracy, gets rid of corruption, economy is improving, and it's right there on the border of russia. so i think it makes him very nervous, if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia, as you know, which is propped up by energy. >> charlie: should we revisit the question of georgia and nato? >> yes. i really believe that we should sponsor the inclusion of georgia into nato. every few weeks the russians move the fe
are all in talks with iran over its nuclear program. while they talk, energy companies are chomping at the bit to get back into theç islac republic. sanction-free. sharon epperson talking with two big companies now making plans to do just that. she joins us live in houston. hi, sharon. >> reporter: hi, sue. ceos of some of the major oil and gas companies in europe are really looking for investments overseas, including iran. i spoke to the ceo of totale in france, who said they are definitely interested in investing in iran under the right conditions. >> even on what we call the interim period, we might start discussing. we will not invest, we will not negotiate new terms until we can do it. >> reporter: the ceo of italy's eni was the first western oil company ceo to meet with iran's oil minister once that preliminary nuclear deal was reached last year at the end of last year. he says he applauds iran's decision to retool the terms of their business model and in terms of enticing more investment in iran's energy sector, but he says there are definitely some changes that need to be
and western europe are reliant for a large portion of their energy needs. be a douchewill it -- we have anastasia, ryan, i want to start with you. what are you hearing from the people there and whether they have a sense things will not continue to get worse right now. class a lot to talk about. let's start with some of the unrest in the east in the country. , an has been the city industrial city of about one million people. about 500 miles east of here. the last few hours, we have seen clashes. we effectively had a group of about 2000 pro-russian protesters. 5000 pro-ukrainian protesters. then the police were brought in separately. a group actually stormed a regional government building there. we heard the day before yesterday president putin talking about why russian forces are in crimea and why he is looking at the ukraine. he talks about the need to protect russian speaking people. this would of course give him an excuse to go in eastern ukraine, something he said he did not see the need for yet. it is certainly something to watch. then at ground zero in his crisis, that is crimea. t
for natural gas and energy from russia to europe. when you look at the region you can see that half of russian exports are to the european union. this is all-important. those are the major pipelines we're looking tlat. in terms of stocks you're not seeing the big dramatic impact at the opening bell that we thought. at worse you had dow futures down 160 points now down about 100. here's the conventional wisdom. russian stock market got slammed. the russian currency slammed. russian businessmen outraged, very concerned about what's going to happen to their economy. now you hear people saying that maybe, just maybe those russian markets are going to be a very powerful diplomat and temper some of the saber rattling we've been seeing, that big reaction in russian markets means perhaps the worst is behind us because why in the world would anybody try to do anything to make markets continue to be unstable there. that's the thinking right now. dow is down about 100 points. >> only two minutes in and more than 100 points. let's bring in our global economic analyst. what's your take. why this quick coll
a relatively modest economy with the exception of its energy capabilities and leverage. it's got a military that has a lot of nuclear weapons it's a conscript military. he is, today, punching way above his weight class, and the united states is punching way below ours. >> mr. secretary, thank you for talking to us, you bet. >> as the ukraine crisis gets worse even the mainstream media -- washington editorial saying president obama's foreign policy based on fantasy. former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening, glad to be with you from london. >> yes. i don't mean to be heart beat on editorial. seems to be a departure when the "the washington post" comes out and uses the term fantasy at such an ominous time it's an accurate description of what's going on. the president's main problem is that he just doesn't care about america national security issues. he doesn't focus on it. he said back in the 2008 campaign that his priority was transforming american society. that's what he is up to. so, in 2008, nato made a terrible mistake when the europeans rejected our
. the republicans are planning to roll out their own budget and offered general goals on taxes, trade, energy, and regulatory curves. democrats will keep pointing out the upbeat economic outlook. >> let me jump in. we know congressional hearings on the budget again next week, including one wednesday with the finance committee chairman ron wyden. >> talking about breathing room for more -- he is new to the tax-writing panel. he has his own ideas about tax policy. again, it is a forum for airing ideas about the broader economy. you want be seeing the summit -- senate democrats be doing their own budget plan. the field the december agreement put the spending caps in place. the republicans will do their own plan, which will contrast with the administration's blueprint. >> house republicans met and talked about alternatives to the health care law. next week, there is a bill scheduled. what about the bill and what is the current republican strategy? >> they obviously still object to obamacare. i think they have moved away from trying to repeal it. now they are going after individual pieces. the mea
't been more aggressive with regards to russia. it's because of their energy dependance on russia. one-third of the national gas coming from russia ironically through ukraine. and you made a very important point there, we know in many cases oligarch has ties to london and that's why the uk, too, may not want to be more active than someone else. i think the eu is going to remain pretty passive here and they will continue to find a peaceful and diplomatic way to solve this crisis. >> certainly something that angela merkel and the germans have been pushing for over the last couple of days. we'll come back to you later in the show. joining us now is benwa ann from societe generale. you were saying yesterday that we need to take a central strategy here particularly where central europe is concerned. has your view changed given what we've heard about the troops in russia right now? >> the situation remains quite volatile. so it's probably too early to make a final call on this, as we discussed earlier the situation is evolving and we are still in much more on the bull markets. but you're rig
for economic growth, energy and the environment. is that -- >> that's about right. >> the beginning of the conversation about to happen. play out the situation in the ukraine for a moment. >> well the situation they have a governance crisis and they are going to have an economic crisis if these withdrawals continue. they have about $18 billion in reserves, $27 billion, $28 billion in debt. they owe the imf about $3.7 billion, they owe creditors over the course of the next 12 months or so maybe $1.72 billion, in interest, and then there's always the rollover question, people really lost a lot of confidence in their economies. >> but handicap it for us. what is going to happen? what is the role that russia is going to play? where is the -- how does this all end? >> it's very hard to figure out. there's no way of knowing how it's going to end. they've had a lot more violence than they ever anticipated for the russians or the ukrainians themselves, these revolutions in eastern europe really haven't been deadly. now a lot of people have been killed and there's a risk there will be more.
for energy. they unfortunately are forced to use coal and that creates the dirty air. 1950s in london we had severe pollution problems that killed people until the clean air act came in and then we saw significant improvements. >> i know quite a lot of people don't want to live in beijing anymore because it's a daily risk. >>> let's move to ukraine. the interim authorities have ordered the riot police and marks men to be disbanded. they were seen to be responsible for the targeting killing in kiev last week. russia appealed for international condemnation for what it says is increasing, as it put it, neo fascist sentiment in the west of ukraine. the foreign minister sergei lavrov says there's an attempt to turn russian-speaking residents into non-citizens. live to independence square, tim willcox. >> reporter: this national unity government is expected to be announced tomorrow. parliament is sitting today. we're expecting remarkable, extraordinary scenes later on. the potential cabinet ministers are due to be paraded on the stage just behind me here in independence square. at 7:00 local time,
on exports and direct investment in the russian energy infrastructure and business -- >> you think that's sufficient to back off -- i want to get our other experts in. but so far they're not connected or at least not connected with me. i apologize to the viewers on that. we'll get them on. let me stay with this, benn steil. german's foreign minister has been making unpersuasive sounds in all the reports today. he doesn't seem to want to go along with the drill about preparation for g-8 or not going to the g-8 meeting in sochi. i haven't heard a thing. you ascribe that to natural gas? that's it? >> it's not just natural gas. it's the business that german industrial outfits like siemens are doing within russia. and the russians know very well when they invaded the breakaway georgian republics like south ossetia in 2008, the west did absolutely nothing. so this is playing according to script. >> do we have general mccaffrey? >> i think so. >> i beg your pardon, for whatever snafu we had. let me ask you the question about this 5:00 a.m. deadline and whether russia is going to tell ukraine t
. steel, power producers. 65% of the energy needs are produced by: this country and a lot of these producers are around the city of beijing. they do not necessarily have the filters on the smokestack and that is why we get stuck with the smog. today, absolutely what they call a blue sky day here in beijing. it oftentimes is the opening of the biggest party. temperatures drop, skies clear, and then they all gather and do their thing. like magic. stephen engle reporting their live from beijing. to reducetic evidence issues in the crimea, they consider a loan to help pay its debt to the national gas exporter, gaza problem -- ga zprom. ryan chilcote filed this report. >> in independence square, calling on the men in the crowd to sign up for the ukrainian army to take on russian forces in crimea. theexpectation here is that next round may not involve troops at all. the ukraine relies on russia for most of its energy. they use the natural gas to fuel its industry and heat homes. that reliance will be russia's next weapon. they could punish the ukraine by cutting the gas off alto
of the car. tpg group chairman said dole in his opening address underlined that it takes energy determination and belief in the future to go with less than one generation state of war to being a fully fledged member of the biggest club but the bumper six. we admire everything has been the context. and he added that the ppp group has always supported cr which its european ambitions. our supporters constant and other wavering because we are convinced that we are destined to belong to the same community of values we welcome you with open arms is a partner. they're very much looking forward to working with you. croatian democratic union president you must love come on go. it was party played a catalyst role in pushing for the eu accession. what is there an hour or an opposition is today addressed the meeting by underlining the importance of eu membership. the first of july twenty thirteen croatia is returning home to the u word belongs as a central european country. he was much more than a common market is a community of free nations for which it wishes to contribute to this community we will sup
to decide what they do now. will it be sanctions? will they reconsider the energy relations with russia? it is a difficult situation europe is in now. >> it seems they are intent on keeping the diplomatic channels open. but will a diplomatic solution work? >> they hope it will. this is the most severe crisis since the cold war. there are still a lot of diplomatic channels. there is soviet interdependence. there are some money channels, they have traditionally, the g-8, nato, and others. there are established connections. and the head of state is in contact with the leaders in russia. there is hope with the high representatives going to kiev. >> thank you for that report from brussels. correspondent in the crimea. alexander, it has been a tense situation there. tell us what is going on. >> some interesting developments going on here. presumably, russian soldiers took over control of key sites in the city. now there are reports that those men have started to pull out of the city center, and the pro-russian militia has taken over the control. i have been to the parliamentary building behin
. we have sioux falls with a bit of this energy. the biggest storm has been across southern california and an incredible storm for them. largest in years. over this week, 4.35 inches in downtown los angeles. much more in san gabriel. 3.6 inches. that gives you an idea of how big this was for them. almost 15 inches in a year. we need the rain. they need more as well. heavy rainfall into arizona as well. about an inch of rain. you see the snow from around kansas through parts of the valley. this area of pink that i am most concerned about. freezing rain and a warm batch moving through southern missouri. you see another batch later this evening. get ready. this ohio river valley with cincinnati and lexington. some of the areas see about a half inch of ice. that will be big problems. arkansas as well. going through the south, the majority of the storm and philadelphia and d.c. likely seeing to eight inches. >> thanks for the heads up. >> in ukraine reaching dangerous new levels. sparking canada to withdraw the ambassador from moscow. the sovereigntyy and integrity have been violated. can t
. this is all because of what's happening in ukraine? >> you have the biggest energy user. we see these spikes in oil when we have tensions rise in the middle east, and then they come back down again when you see those recede. when people talk about trade sanctions, you can see how it could hit the likes of russia. 20% of their national income comes from natural gas alone. so it could hurt them. you have to say, russia is not iran. i was looking at some of the stats from b.p. statistical review. a third of natural gas imports into e.u. come from russia. any kinds of trade sanctions there would hurt russia, and it would hurt europe, too. >> and there are questions raised about what will be the spongs in terms of sanctions, but also what will be the russian response with regard to gas supplies. the gas problem has been suggesting it could end natural gas discounts to ukraine and that could have effects to the rest of europe. >> it would definitely do that. the gas problem today is one of the biggest in the equity market down to almost 10%. they are -- down almost 10%. they are getting hit hard.
of energy based on the idea that we could see sanctions on russia. obviously, we're waiting today for further news on just what action the west is going to take. but right now, we're seeing brent and u.s. crude higher in trade this morning. the dow is down around 0.8%. we've got dollar/ruble trading at five-year highs. i mentioned those actionses and the potential oil impact, gas impact. gazprom one of the key losers for the russian market. we've got a broader impact as far as the russian markets are concerned than what we're seeing in poland, as well. so the real dominating factor is the ukraine. thousands of russian troops are focused in the crimea region following a dramatic weekend in the ukraine. this is a declaration of war by vladimir putin. u.s. secretary of state john kerry condemning russia's actions and will travel to kiev tomorrow for talks with the new ukrainian government. >> president putin is using force in a completely inappropriate manner. fears he's going to lose on the international stage. russia is going to lose. >> steve, it's the one possible benefit of seei
missions canceled. naval cooperation talks canceled. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. until the crisis in crimea is further resolved. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? guest: the economic situation in russia may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. this is according to senior officials. they think that the russian ruble will tumble. willinvestment in russia fall. and that this will have a cumulative effect to pushing those who can influence moscow to have a change of calculus. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. putin has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he has to suffer under, he is willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. host: what is the point of all this? from mr. putin's position. guest: for putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. he believes, and many russian
countries around the world have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they are doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavywater facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. onyou know why iran insists doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries do not do? it is because iran does not want a peaceful nuclear program. iran once a military nuclear program. i said it here once, i will say it here again -- if it looks like a duck, if it walks like a duck, if a quack like a duck, what is it? it ain't a chicken. it is certainly not a dove. it is still a nuclear duck. [applause] unfortunately, the leading powers of the world are talking about leaving iran with the capability to enrich uranium. i hope they do not do that. error.uld be a grave iranuld leave the ron -- as a threshold nuclear power. to rapidlyable iran develop nuclear weapons at a time when the world's attention and we seeelsewhere as we speak that that could happen. ,n one part of the world today tomorrow and another part, maybe north korea. just remember
crush the ukrainian oligarchs. they can cut off the energy to ukraine. if putin does not want to use leverage to support secession is financial levers over the medium-term to make ukraine the losers. >> what is the possibility of civil war? >> i think it is low in the near term. today, the most interesting news to me has come out of crimea where the russians have a base and naval infantry division. there were riots -- demonstrations that looked a little like riots. they were not violent. they forced the town council there to get rid of their mayor and except a russian citizen as their mayor. they also flew some russian flags. that shows their disposition. the crimean people, the majority of them have no interest in being a part of ukraine. if the russians want to stir up trouble, that's where they can do it. in the near-term, i don't think the russians will push that. if they push for civil war, you will have a republic of western ukraine is going to want to join nato imminently. outia makes a lot of money of transiting angie -- energy through ukraine and if they cannot do that, that
the in stability could affect the global economy. one of the main concerns is energy, ukraine's strategically linked russia to the rest of europe. and russia supplies 25% of europe's gas needs. half of that gas is pumped via pipelines. moscow, we know it has cut can off the flow in past disputes with kiev. it could push up businesses and households. the price of oil is $2 a barrel. a barrel of crude oil costing $111. meanwhile, russia's stock market has dropped around 10% today. and russia's currency is at its lowest point ever against the dollar and the euro. markets around europe have seen sharp falls. take a look. there we go. what the markets are doing. ftse 100, london's main market, down 2%. the dax taking a serious hit there. down 3%. let's get more. andrew joins us from our business newsroom. great to have you with us. we know why the markets are down. i want to talk about specifics. let's talk about gas. that strategic link ukraine has i guess. here's a question. can europe afford those taps to be turn ted off? >> no. i suppose on the other hand you have to say russia can't afford th
, but we think there's still a lot of value in energy and in the tech sector in the larger cap names. >> we, on the other hand, we would be careful -- very quickly, we would be cautious hardi regarding any yield plays or income plays. i would be positioned to play a stronger than expected economy. small banks, community banks in particular are still very cheap and we're in the middle -- we're in the beginning of a consolidation in that industry. so i think that's a great sector to be in. >> so you feel interest rates are rising as the economy gets stronger there. very interesting. thank you all. >> fascinating. >> appreciate it very much. >>> as we sit here, we are near the highs of the day right now. the dow four points off that high we hit earlier in the session with a gain of 235 points. >> we have 45 minutes to go to the close. if at first you don't succeed, try again. that has been the president's motto when it comes to the federal budget. he's trying again today. we'll take a look to see who would be paying more in taxes if he gets his way this time. >>> renowned bond fund pimco has b
. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so we talked about her options. her valuable assets were staying. and selling her car wouldn't fly. we helped sydney manage her debt and prioritize her goals, so she could really turn up the volume on her dreams today...and tomorrow. so let's see what we can do about that... remodel. motorcycle. [ female announcer ] some questions take more than a bank. they take a banker. make a my financial priorities appointment today. because when people talk, great things happen. . >>> look at all that gold. welcome back. new questions this morning about a stash of mystery gold rush era coins. the coins date from the late 1800s are estimated to be worth $10 million. there are reports they were part of a u.s. mint theft over a century ago. we took a closer look. >> reporter: it may be the
with regulation of energy usage, right? as opposed to emission of lead or -- >> well, the main thing now is significant energy fishs. -- efficiency. for example, different kinds of turbirnes and processes -- >> the same as for domestic, energy efficient light bulbs. >> i really don't think this is about light bulbs. mr. chief justice. >> no, but my point is that at the moment that is largely true. >> of course the e.p.a. is considering and scientists are trying to develop other technologies like carbon capture technology that. -- and that's the whole point of best available control technology, that as best -- better options come on line, it allows for that. that's how the statute is supposed to work. >> if you regulate -- i'm trying to understand the arguments in your brief. if you prevail on the first, in other words, greenhouse gases may be regulated with respect to sourced already subject to permitting, my understanding is it gets you to 80% of the greenhouse gases. >> that's correct. >> prevailing on the second gets you to 86%. >> that's correct. >> so this is a fight about an additi
this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ >>> it looks like russian forces are consolidating on crimean. up to 12 trucks of russian troops have crossed into the eastern city of kerch from russia and the movement is being described by ferry. how far will russia go? the retired u.s. army general is joining me. thanks for coming in. if you take a look at russian forces versus ukrainian forces, 845,000 russian troops, 129,000 russian troops, tanks, two to one, combat aircraft, nearly 1400. russian combat aircraft, 221. there's no match. >> no. >> between those two militaries. so if it came down to a war between ukraine and russia, it's over. >> but ukraine has -- is part of a much larger organization in the european community and i don't think it would just be russia against ukraine. >> let's talk about that. let's hope the russias don't decide to move beyond crime and move eastward toward kiev arguing that the president yanukovych, he's still the president, he needs help to --
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